The Malaysian Women Legal Counsel Association Members’ First Gathering

May 23rd, 2017

On 9th April 2017, the Malaysian Women Legal Counsel Association (MWLEC) organised their first members’ gathering in a friendly neighbourhood cafe. The gathering was a perfect opportunity for MWLEC to share the objectives and visions of the association with its members, and also to promote all upcoming activities for the year 2017.

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(Photo with the committee members of MWLEC)

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In 2015, the market was still doing fine, and companies were still hiring although there were concerns of a market slowdown;

In 2016, the market started to experience a slowdown and companies were very cautious about hiring. This led to a freeze in hiring and retrenchment exercises, especially in the oil & gas and financial industries. Furthermore, the property market also shrunk.  This had greatly affected the businesses of many law firms, especially law firms which relied on property and conveyancing works.

This year (2017), the market is still very slow and most of the hiring being done are for replacement purposes and not for purposes of expansion. However, there are certain areas of legal work that are still doing fairly well, e.g. construction disputes, foreign investment, and purchase of land by foreign parties. Divorce cases are increasing every year (always on a rise and seemingly not affected by market conditions).

During this period of economic downturn, big corporations are the ones that are being hit the hardest, and would either freeze hiring or hire mainly for replacement purposes. In contrast, smaller companies, especially those with stronger cash flow, are still boldly expanding in the current market conditions and are willing to hire for expansion as they see opportunities of gaining something of value for a cheaper price during the market slowdown.

Due to the decrease in the value of our Ringgit, some foreign companies have chosen Malaysia as their legal hub to provide support for both regional and global legal work, and these foreign companies are therefore still aggressively hiring. More international companies have set up legal hubs in Malaysia for cost-cutting purposes, hence more hiring is in turn being done, especially within the oil & gas companies.

Law firms are now very cautious in hiring and the outlook does not seem very optimistic, with some large firms notably having reduced the amount of increments and bonuses paid out. Some law firms are even cutting salaries and freezing bonuses, and some have even laid- off their lawyers.

Despite the market slowdown, where potential employers are cautious about the future market outlook, the output of fresh graduates continue to increase due to the establishment of more and more law schools. The Malaysian market is experiencing a situation similar to that which occurred in Singapore two years ago, where fresh law graduates faced challenges in securing pupillage posts and lawyers who have just been called to the Bar faced challenges in securing entry-level legal assistant positions.

However, Eddie is still generally very optimistic about the legal job market, as good legal talents will still be sought after in every kind of market condition. The key is to start equipping yourself to become a talent so that you won’t be affected by the market.

During the sharing session, these were the questions posed to Eddie, together with the answers he provided:

  1. We have heard that Chinese-based corporation are more generous in terms of salary offers, is that true or is it just a rumour?

Eddie:  So far, I do not have any direct involvement in recruiting for any Chinese-based corporation, but I have heard that they are willing to pay high salary and you are expected to work equally hard. This is due to the working culture back in China where they place a strong emphasis on efficiencies and results.

  1. Do retrenchment exercises carried out by financial institutions often involve their legal departments?

Eddie: Banks are still seeking out talents although they do not hire as many new employees as before. As Bank Negara has now imposed more stringent compliance demands upon financial institutions, there are more vacancies for compliance roles now as compared to before.

  1. In terms of industry, which top three industries have a stronger budget when it comes to hiring legal talent?

Eddie: It is very hard to answer that question according to industries as the offer may range widely within the same industry. I would say a candidate whose job scope is to support regional works will usually be able to command a higher salary. Secondly, foreign companies usually pay their employees higher salary as compared to local companies. In terms of law firms, the more reputable firms or boutique law firms would typically offer a higher salary.

  1. Can you share with us what are the three No-Nos during an interview?

Eddie:  Sure. Firstly, never badmouth your employer and the keyword here is “badmouth” as opposed to hiding the real reason for leaving. There is a fine line between badmouthing and stating the facts, especially when the push factor for leaving a particular job is people. No employer would want to hire a candidate with bad attitude or character (badmouthing is a sign of bad character), no matter how smart the candidate may be.

Secondly, when it comes to explaining your reasons for leaving, never say the reason is for MONEY ONLY. Why? If a candidate changes jobs just because of money, I doubt that the person will stay in any position for long, so again no employer would want to invest in candidates who have the short-term mentality. Anyhow, most employers will not be against the idea of you asking for a salary increase when you join them, so why highlight something that is not an issue?

Lastly, never be late, because first impressions really count. It is reasonable for an employer to perceive someone who is late for an interview as not being serious or keen about the particular job. Failure to be on time may also be attributed to poor time management, poor planning skills, and may imply that the candidate is unreliable, disrespectful and untrustworthy. You do not want to create such a negative impression even before being interviewed by the employer. In the event that you are late, always inform the employer in advance, provide an explanation of why you are late, and be apologetic.

 

 

When Should We Ask About Salary During A Job Interview?

March 25th, 2017

interview tips

When do you think is the appropriate point of time to ask for information about the compensation package during a job interview? To be honest, this question never crossed my mind until I became a recruiter.

Recently, I read a piece of news entitled ‘This Woman’s Job Interview Was Cancelled Because She Asked How Much She’d Be Paid’ . I found this interesting and given that the topic seems relevant to job seekers today, I believe that it is important to share my thought on this issue.

First of all, I hold the view that asking about salary information before accepting a job offer is absolutely valid and reasonable. In fact, salary is one of the factors that many would consider as crucial when they are planning to make a career move. As much as we are motivated to work for a purpose or to make a meaningful contribution, we still require money for livelihood and to sustain our living. I believe this is an undisputable fact. However, the issue here is principally to do with timing; when is the right moment to ask about compensation during the interview stage? What are the implications of asking this question at an inappropriate point of time?

When to ask for salary information

The answer to this depends on how you came across the job opportunity in the first place.

In the event that you are approached by a recruiter/head hunter to explore a job opening, you may ask the recruiter about the salary budget of this role before you even agree to send your CV to him/her, assuming that in most scenarios, the recruiter would not know your expected salary and you won’t want to waste everyone’s time if the salary budget of the job does not match your expected salary. As long as you make your intentions clear to the recruiter before you ask this question, I think it should be fine. Anyhow, an experienced recruiter would take the initiative to check whether your expected salary is within the budgeted salary for a particular role before proceeding to recommend you to the potential employer.

Therefore, it is not difficult to ascertain when to ask the question on salary when you are dealing with a recruiter. In fact, this is one of the advantages of dealing with a recruiter in job hunting.

On the other hand, in the event that you apply for a job directly on your own or you are recommended by recruiter and have been shortlisted to attend an interview directly with the potential employer, when would be the right time to raise the question regarding salary package?

The short answer to the question is – you don’t raise the question of salary until the potential employer raises it, especially when you have informed the recruiter of your expected salary or you have stated your expected salary on the employment application form or on your CV, in which case, the potential employer is already well-informed of your expectations in terms of remuneration.

The logic behind this answer is that your expected salary is also one of the crucial information which an employer needs to know before hiring you. In view of this, if the potential employer does not discuss your expected salary with you during the interview, there are 3 possibilities as to why:

1. They may not be keen to hire you so they don’t need to discuss this with you at all. If this is the case, then they don’t need to bother to ask;
2. They are keen to hire you but would prefer to discuss this with you via the recruiter; or
3. They are keen to hire you but they already know your expected salary based on the information given by the recruiter and/or on your application form or CV.

Implications of asking about salary at a premature stage

This depends on how early you raise the question about salary. Below are several possible scenarios:

1. Asking the question about salary when you first meet the potential employer even before any discussion about the job takes place– this is a big NO NO. This clearly shows that your only motivation to apply for the job is money and nothing else other than money. If money is the only motivational factor, it is reasonable to assume that you will quickly move on to another job whenever you are offered a higher pay. Employers are not keen to hire this kind of employee as job-hopping disrupts the work productivity in a company.

No doubt, as mentioned, money is one of the most important factors which motivates us in our working life. However, when it becomes the only motivating factor to join a company, it may not be good for the development of your career too.

In addition, such action also reflects that you are simply too blunt and lack the ability to assess when to ask or to say something and when to wait for a more appropriate moment. This weakness is harmful to a team. I am sure you have come across such a person in your working life who in fact may be a kind person without bad intentions, but are just somehow rather thoughtless and annoying when they open their mouths.

2. Asking about salary after discussing the job, but before the potential employer raises the issue – as mentioned above, though it seems premature to ask, sometimes it may still be regarded as acceptable by some employers.

If an employer would get annoyed by this question after having discussed the job scope, even going to the extent of canceling the second interview on the assumption that you are too money-minded, this reflects that the potential employer is rather judgmental. In this case, you need to think twice before accepting any job offer from such an employer.

In conclusion, I always advise my candidates not to raise the question of salary before the employer raises it, since asking such a question at an inappropriate time may ruin the first impression that the potential employer has formed on you. Just like before when a boyfriend proposes to a girlfriend, if the girl’s first response is to ask him the amount of monthly living allowance that he can provide her after their marriage, I guess the boyfriend may really end up thinking twice if he should marry the girl after all.

Instead, during a job interview, you should take the opportunity to focus on discussing and understanding the role, the expectations of the employer, career prospects, and the company culture and direction, as these are more crucial information that you will need before you make an informed decision on whether or not to move to a new job.

About the author:

Eddie Law is a lawyer turns legal career adviser. He is currently the managing director of eLawyer Recruitment which specialises in helping lawyers to secure jobs in both law firms and corporations. eLawyer has more than 8,000 registered members (and still counting).  Eddie was described by Malaysian SME newspaper as a person who set the benchmark of legal recruitment industry in Malaysia. Eddie is passionate and generous about sharing his thoughts and experience on legal career related issues with young and potential lawyers, giving insight views of the career path of a lawyer, inspiring lawyers to excel in their profession, harness their leadership skill and personal growth. To-date, Eddie has spoken at Kuala Lumpur Bar, both public and private universities and appeared in numerous conferences, local radio stations, newspapers and online TV.

Coffee Talk with MWLEC

March 17th, 2017

(This article is reproduced with the permission of the Malaysian Women Legal Counsel Association (MWLEC)).

Our Eddie Law recently had a great time chatting over cups of coffee with the vibrant individuals from the Malaysian Women Legal Counsel Association, also known as MWLEC.

MWLEC is a new association which has been set up specifically with the aim of providing support and useful insights to female in-house counsels in Malaysia, in order to help them advance in their chosen careers and increase their marketability. This dynamic association provides its members with the latest legal updates, news, as well as valuable training programs in order to stay relevant in this competitive field.

In the interview, Eddie had the opportunity to share his knowledge and expertise on various issues such as the latest development in the legal recruitment industry, must-have criteria to succeed as in-house counsels, tips on training needs and the overall market outlook for the legal industry. Read on!

eddie2COFFEE TALK WITH EDDIE, THE FOUNDER OF ELAWYER

  1. In this digital era, has there been any change in terms of the tools used by the hiring manager to assess a candidate?

Eddie: Well, some hiring managers these days are checking online profiles of potential candidates via major social media platforms such as LinkedIn or Facebook to have a better understanding of the candidate. Therefore, it is advisable to maintain a presentable profile online.

On another note, more and more companies have also adopted the online Psychometric Tests to screen candidates. The Psychometric Test is used to gauge the candidates’ suitability for a role by determining if the candidate possesses the personality, characteristics and aptitude required for a specific role. Surprisingly, many candidates who seem to be articulate and appear to be “smart” during interview were unable to do well in the said test.

  1. Based on your experience, what was the most unusual request you received from a hiring manager before they conduct its first interview with a candidate?

Eddie: On one occasion, an employer requested me to provide information on the marital status of female candidate and if she is married, whether she has children and the age of the children. The reason behind such unusual request is that the employer prefers candidate who could commit to long work hours as and when required. The employer also mentioned that they have had a history of former female employees taking emergency leave frequently to attend to the needs of her young family.

Please do bear in mind that this was an exceptional case, most employers do not have such a preference. I personally think that with the current development in technology, there is increasing flexibility in how work can be performed. Hence, this change will benefit young mothers and empower them in their work. Employers should abandon this biased mentality as they could “miss out” on hiring young mothers with great talent.

  1. What type of training would you encourage an in-house counsel to attend in order for them to maintain their employability?

 

Eddie: In addition to attending trainings to sharpen their existing skill set, in-house counsels should attend industrial trainings. It is crucial for in-house counsels to have a better understanding of the industry trend so that they can provide more practical and strategic advice to the business without depending on an external lawyer. In depth knowledge of the industry is the differentiating factor between an in-house counsel and external lawyer.

 

Last but not least, leadership and managerial trainings are equally important for an in-house counsel. A successful corporate counsel is not merely a technical expert but also a great leader/people manager. Without good leadership and people management skills, it will be very challenging to lead a team.  An in-house counsel has to deal with co-workers from various levels of the organisation so they must possess good people skills in order to perform their functions effectively.

 

  1. What is your advice for someone who newly joins in-house position from a law firm?

 

Eddie: This is my advice to you:-

  1. Be humble and be humble! I must say that assuming the role of an in-house counsel is more than just providing legal advice. It is very challenging as you are expected to think like a commercial lawyer, so you need to learn how to be more commercially savvy. You will also need to know how to deal with/manage people of different levels of seniority and background to ensure effective communication and work harmoniously with each of them. Your work will not be purely legal, it will also involve the “operational” aspect of the business so you need to learn to be more flexible in your thinking, to provide more practical and relevant advice for the business (as opposed to giving pure “legal” advice only). You need to understand the industry and business operations of the company. It is quite obvious that a former lawyer who turns to becoming an in-house counsel has many things to learn so they should be more open to learning those things.
  2. Communicate, communicate and communicate! I have observed so many private practitioners struggling to adjust themselves into the corporate working culture. In particular, former lawyers find that people management/engagement is the most challenging aspect in a corporate working environment. In fact, all of these issues can be resolved with better communication and by being more diplomatic as and when you approach the business. Hostile confrontation and sarcasm will only ruin working relationships with co-workers and hinder your advancement in climbing the corporate ladder.

 

  1. Tell us about yourself and eLawyer.

 

Eddie: I am a lawyer turned legal recruiter. I started my career in private practice, before working as an in-house counsel. In 2007, I started a law portal called eLawyer.com.my (“eLawyer”) and began providing legal recruitment services around the year 2009. eLawyer provides two main services which are “Online Job Board Listing” and “Executive Search Service”.

 

My working experience in a law firm and as a corporate counsel sets me apart from normal recruiters, as I better understand the needs and requirements of both employers and candidates. I believe this enables me to make a better match between employer and candidate.

 

As of today, eLawyer has successfully helped more than 500 legal talents in securing their ideal jobs (excluding those who secure jobs through the online job listing board) and has served more than 500 law firms and corporations in recruitment.  There are more than 7,500 lawyers registered with us.

 

  1. For the past 9 years in eLawyer, do you see an increase in the in-house legal post in Malaysia? Yes/no, why?

 

Eddie: Yes, I see more and more in house jobs available in the market  because more companies are becoming aware of the importance of having an in-house counsel, there are more stringent regulatory requirements, and it saves cost (when a company grows to a certain size, having an in-house lawyer can help to save on legal fees).

 

  1. How would you describe a good in-house counsel?

 

Eddie: I would say a good in-house counsel is:-

 

  • a trusted counsel by the senior management and team members.
  • able to understand the business of the employer well.
  • able to offer strategic and practical legal advice.
  • a good team leader and effective manager.
  • a person who has good legal skill and a business mind.

 

  1. Can you share with us, what would be the overall market outlook for in-house legal jobs in year 2017?

 

Eddie: Due to the slowdown in the economy (or at least with the perceived slowdown), there may not be as many new openings in the job market. That being said, there are still many existing job vacancies available. In any economic condition, talented and capable people will always be sought-after.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eddie Law wins Entrepreneurship Alumni Award from Anglia Ruskin University in the UK

March 4th, 2017

 

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Eddie Law received award from Vice Chancellor of ARU

Our very own Eddie Law, the founder and managing director of eLawyer, has done us proud by emerging as one of the winners of Anglia Ruskin University Vice Chancellor’s Outstanding Alumni Award in the United Kingdom late last year. The awards were conferred to selected graduates of the university who have gone on to excel in their respective fields after leaving the university, particularly when their study at the university have significantly played a role in their professional success thereafter.

All the award winners

All the award winners

The Anglia Ruskin University Vice Chancellor’s Outstanding Alumni Awards were divided into 5 categories, namely Alumni Service to Society Award, Alumni Contribution to Culture Award, Alumni Entrepreneur of the Year Award, Young Alumni of the Year Award, and Alumni Lifetime Achievement Award.

Eddie Law was selected as a runner-up for the Alumni Entrepreneur of the Year award. This award was intended to honour and celebrate those who have made a difference by contributing to a local, national or international community through the creation of or significant involvement in a successful and meaningful business venture. The judging criteria for this award include the display of outstanding leadership and administrative skills in an entrepreneurial area, and evident track record of taking calculated risks or pursuing innovative approaches, which have brought positive impact to the business venture.

Among more than the ten winners who were honoured and celebrated for the day, Eddie was the only Asian. It was truly a proud moment for this Sitiawan-born humble and hardworking man, who in 2007 left legal practice and took a leap of faith to set up a first-of-its-kind online legal portal in Malaysia. Now a leading figure in the legal recruitment industry, Eddie has gone a long way since he first started out as an entrepreneur, with this award being the latest addition to a long list of achievements under his belt. Eddie now continues to inspire others by actively blogging and speaking on various platforms on legal career paths and personal growth. Winning this award, being a tangible recognition for his hard work and dedication, is indeed both meaningful and memorable for him.

The university’s inaugural alumni awards ceremony, held on 7 December 2016, was a glitzy and convivial affair. The Vice Chancellor, Professor Iain Martin, did the honours and presented the awards to the jubilant winners. It was definitely a momentous and happy night for Eddie and we certainly cannot be prouder of him. May eLawyer continue to grow and soar to even greater heights.

 

How to download files from the Malaysian Court Online File Search System

February 19th, 2017

(This article is used with the permission of the author, Mr. Foong Cheng Leong.)

One of the weaknesses of our Court’s efiling system is the online file search system. A user has to pay RM12 (for High Court and above) or RM6 (for Subordinate Courts) to be able to do an online file search for a maximum period of 30 minutes. The time runs upon opening a file on the website (at main page, under Public Services menu).

However, one cannot download a file from the website but one can only view it. The viewing function allows one to view one page at a time and also print one page at a time. Each page takes some time to load and 30 minutes is not sufficient.

This is baffling. Why can’t they put a function to allow users to download the entire file? This is what you get when you roll out a system without proper consultation with the end users.

In any event, to overcome this problem, I found a solution. Here are the steps:-

1. Download the free software PDF24 and install it on your PC.
2. Open the file you intend to download on the Online File Search System (login to the system first).

3. Choose PDF24 as the printer.

4. Every page will be printed as a separate file on PDF24. To merge them, click on the Merge button on top. All the pages will be merged into one file!

5. Save the file.
6. Repeat step 2 to 5 above for other files.

* Tip – Close the file on the search system to stop the timer.

Entry of Foreign Law Firms into Malaysia – the effects on the local job market

February 7th, 2017

foreign law firms in Malaysia

An interesting development in the local legal scene is the recent entry of Herbert Smith Freehills (HSF) into Malaysia as a qualified foreign law firm (QFLF) approved by the Malaysian Bar Council. With the required approval in place, HSF is expected to open its local office in Kuala Lumpur in May 2017. This would mark HSF’s ninth base in the region after establishing its presence in numerous other Asian cities including Singapore, Hong Kong, Bangkok and Jakarta. This third largest practice among international law firms in Asia has previously advised several giant Malaysian companies such as Axiata, Petronas and Sime Darby. HSF has indicated that their Malaysian-based team will be focusing on specific practice areas such as transactions, disputes, and Islamic finance.

Liberalisation of the legal services industry in Malaysia took off in 2014 following significant amendments made to the Legal Profession Act 1976. Foreign firms are now allowed to set up in Malaysia either by obtaining a QFLF licence or by entering into a joint venture with a local outfit. HSF will be the second foreign firm to open office in Malaysia under the newly-introduced QFLF licence regime, after Trowers & Hamlins filled up the first spot in 2015. Despite this being a fairly recent development, we can already see the landscape of the local legal services industry rapidly changing.

The QFLF regime was introduced primarily to support the Malaysian Government’s International Islamic Finance Centre (“MIFC”) initiative. Therefore, firms who apply for the licence are required to have expertise in the area of international Islamic finance. The other route for foreign firms to establish a presence in Malaysia is through forming an International Partnership with a local entity. Both routes would require application for licences, which will be renewable every 3 years.

In opening up our legal services market, it is evident that efforts have been taken to achieve a balance between reaping the benefits of liberalisation and protecting the growth and competitiveness of Malaysian law firms. To this end, certain ring-fencing measures have been put in place. Although QFLF firms are allowed to operate independently without being associated with any local firms, they need to ensure that at least 30% of their fee earners are Malaysians.

In cases of foreign entry through establishing an International Partnership, the Malaysian joint-venture partner must hold at least 60% of the firm’s equity and voting rights. The percentage of local lawyers working in such a firm must be 60% or more and the name of the partnership must reflect both the joint-venture partners. An example of such an association is the forged alliance between UK law firm DAC Beachcroft and local outfit Gan Partnership in 2016. In terms of practice area, both QFLFs and International Partnerships are not permitted to advise on transactions which involve solely Malaysian law. They are also restricted from practising certain areas of law, including constitutional and administrative law, conveyancing, criminal law and family law.

In the last few years, many local law firms have taken the opportunity to create a stronger regional or global presence by establishing formal links with foreign firms. The oldest exclusive tie-up for a Malaysian firm would be that of Wong & Partners becoming a member firm of Baker & McKenzie International. To cite other examples, Malaysian corporate law firm Foong & Partners joined forces with Singapore’s acclaimed Wong Partnership in 2013, whilst Christopher & Lee Ong forged a strategic alliance with Rajah & Tan in the same year. Fast-growing Rahmat Lim & Partners also chose to go down a similar path by partnering up with Singapore’s Allen & Gledhill. Meanwhile, Abdullah Chan & Co is now able to offer additional reach in Europe after tying up with UK law firm Child & Child and law firm Cotty Vivant Marchisio and Lauzeral headquartered in Paris. Another significant alliance to mention is the exclusive tie-up between Jeff Leong, Poon & Wong with China’s largest law firm, Dacheng Law Alliance which occurred in 2011. Such moves have definitely enhanced these firms’ profiles and credibility at an international level. Yet, it is noted that certain well-established corporate law firms in Malaysia, notably Skrine, Shearn Delamore and Kadir Andri & Partners, have not taken similar steps to formally link up with foreign legal entities.

It is also interesting to observe how the shift towards liberalisation would affect the job market in the Malaysian legal industry. Change is indeed inevitable and we can expect the effects to be seen and felt from many different aspects. Based on the experience of other jurisdictions, would there been an increase in the salary levels for lawyers? In post-liberalised Singapore for instance, foreign firms have been known to pay starting salaries as high as $7,000 to bright young lawyers freshly called to the Bar. With the current highest starting monthly remuneration of RM6,000 offered by Lee-Hishamuddin Alan Gledhill, would we find foreign firms paying even higher than this?

Furthermore, the exposure gained from working on international deals and high-end projects which transcend geographical boundaries would give local talents the opportunity to tap on foreign resources and expertise, paving the way for them to develop their legal skills to a greater level. Clearly, this would make them more marketable and increase their chances of getting jobs in international law firms overseas. Whether this would ultimately result in brain drain in Malaysia remains to be seen and depends on many other factors, including the local economic situation and political climate. It can perhaps be argued that with a higher salary structure in place across the board and the high quality of legal work available locally, the effects of liberalisation on the legal services industry in Malaysia has actually removed at least some of the main incentives for our lawyers to secure employment abroad.

As the saying goes, there are two sides to every coin. With the entry of foreign law firms into the local sphere, would local talents find themselves working in a more competitive and fast-paced environment?

Can we expect the already aggressive talent competition among talented lawyers to further intensify? This may be the case especially for lawyers specialising in specific practice areas such as corporate law, capital markets, projects and banking. Increasingly high expectations will likely translate into longer working hours and the quest to achieve work-life balance may be more challenging than ever.

Nonetheless, it can be argued that the way liberalisation is perceived is a matter of mindset. The stance taken by the industry seems to be that this development should be embraced by our local talents so as to not be left behind both in terms of options and opportunities. So are you ready, young lawyers?

Would You Leave Your Business Decisions To Chance?

July 4th, 2016

(Sponsored post)

Running a business isn’t easy as the nature of business itself involves risk, especially when it comes to payment terms offered on credit. As many business transactions are conducted on credit, it’s important for every business owner and organization to make the best decisions when it comes to credit.

But how does one make the right business decisions? More importantly, informed decisions when it comes to credit? The answer is simple: ensure that you have all the information that you need at your fingertips, and that your information is sufficient, accurate and easy to access. This is where the CTOS Compre Report comes in – it’s your one-stop reference when it comes to business credit information, whether it’s your own or that of a potential customer, partner or vendor.

What’s in the CTOS Compre Report?

 The CTOS Compre Report is exactly what the name says it is – comprehensive. It’s a detailed, in-depth compilation of various types of information required to better understand a business. From business registration details to financial information, litigation records, directorship and shareholding information, it’s all there.

Also included in the CTOS Compre report is the complete Banking Payment History of the business in question, including full CCRIS information. That means trade referee listings, dishonoured cheque information and more.

To summarize, the CTOS Compre Report contains the following:

  • Business registration details for ID verification
  • Financial, directorships, shareholder and share capital information
  • Litigation records, legal cases and case details
  • Banking Payment History (with CCRIS Summary, Details, Derivatives and Dishonoured Cheques details)
  • Trade referee listings
  • Historical enquiries about credit evaluation

As Malaysia’s leading Credit Reporting Agency, we’re confident that the information available in our CTOS Credit Report will add immense value to your business and the relevant decision-making processes.

How can the CTOS Compre Report benefit my business?

Knowledge is always empowering. With the right information, you can:

  • Make better, informed business decisions
  • Avoid unnecessary credit risk
  • Have more control and leave less to chance

When you have this much information about the business you’re checking up on, it becomes a breeze to make informed decisions. By identifying potential risk immediately, you’ll be able to improve your risk management process and avert financial loss.

How much is the CTOS Compre Report and how do I purchase it?

The CTOS Compre Report is currently available at RM199 (normal price RM299). To order, please contact us at 03-2722 8882

 

KL Bar – eLawyer Legal Career Forum 2015

November 25th, 2015

As per the previous year, click here and here for the Legal Career Forum 2014, eLawyer Recruitment is proud to be in the collaboration with the KL Bar to bring you the yearly KL Bar – eLawyer Legal Career Forum.

This year our theme is:

  • Working in different sized law firms: Large? Mid? Small?
  • To be employed? Or self-employed?: Are you ready?

This Forum is intended to benefit members of the Bar, pupils, students and law firms by sharing views of legal practitioners having worked in different organizational structures of legal firms to share their work experience and different expectations of each firm structure including setting up their own legal firms.

In respect of choosing the suitable size of law firm to work for, this Forum is expected to give insight and clarity to students, pupil and young lawyers on the working experience and conditions in large, medium and small firms. This will give an opportunity for them to decide where they are better suited to work. Attendees will have a better understanding of the workings and demands of different sized legal firms and will be able to make an informed decision on employment.

In respect of to be employed or self-employed, this Forum will also include a discussion on the difference of being self-employed and being in employment. The discussions will cover questions on when is a lawyer ready to set up legal practice on his/her own and the challenges that may be faced by them.

This Forum is open to all lawyers, pupils and law students. 

Details of the even are as follows:-

Date: 12 December 2015 (Saturday)

Venue: Legal Aid Training Room, Suite 202-204, 2nd Floor, Wisma Hangsam, No. 1 Jalan Hang Lekir, 50000 Kuala Lumpur. 

The agenda for the Forum is as follows:-

8.30 am – Registration

9.00 am to 9.10 am – Briefing by emcee

9.10 am to 9.20 am – Welcome speech by the Chairman of the Kuala Lumpur Bar Committee

9.20 am to 10.00 am – Forum commences with talk by Legal Career Consultant, Eddie Law. 

10.00 am to 12.45 pm – Forum discussion and Q & A

12.45 pm to 1.30 pm – Refreshment

The speakers for the Forum are as follows:

  • Mathew Thomas Philip

mathew

Mathew Thomas Philip has over 20 years of experience in handling complex and contentious civil and commercial litigation. He has counselled and represented domestic and international clients and has successfully negotiated over 300 settlements during his career. Mathew regularly advises MNCs and SMEs on litigation risk and represents them in negotiations and execution of strategy. He commenced pupillage at Messrs Raja, Darryl and Loh in 1991 and continued practice with them as a Legal Assistant for the next 6 years. In 1997, Mathew became a Partner at Messrs Thomas Philip, Kwa & Lou and in the year 2004, he found Messrs Thomas Philip and has been the Managing Partner since.

  • Vasanthi Rasathurai

vasanthi

Vasanthi Rasathurai has over 10 years of litigation experience in civil and commercial law which includes all areas of contract, tort, conveyancing, company, media, land, local government, defamation and intellectual property. She has worked in different sized firms over the years and is currently practising as a Partner with Messrs Vin Partnership. She commenced legal practice at Messrs Shafee & Co. After 3 years, she pursued the Masters in Law in London. Upon completion, she returned to Malaysia and commenced practice with Messrs Shearn Delamore where she specialized in intellectual property for 3 years. Later, she joined Messrs Zaid Ibrahim & Co before returning to Messrs Shafee & Co. In 2011, she founded Messrs Vasanthi Rasa & Associated and was its principle for more than 3 years before joining the current firm

  • Eddie Law

Mr. Eddie Law

Eddie Law is the founder and Managing Director of eLawyer.com.my (he was called to the Bar in 2003). He has both private practice and in-house experience before he ventured into legal recruitment 7 years ago. His clients include law firms (both local and international) and corporations. In 2015, Eddie was named by the Asia Law Portal as the Top 30 People to Watch in the Business of Law in Asia in. Further on October 2015, Eddie was described by Malaysian SME newspaper as a person who set the bench mark of legal recruitment industry in Malaysia. Eddie is passionate and generous about sharing his thoughts and experience on legal career related issues with young an potential lawyers, giving insight views of the career path of a lawyer, inspiring lawyers to excel in their profession, harness their leadership skills and personal growth.

Moderation: Choo Dee Wei, a partner at Messrs C.K. Hau & Co. He commenced practice in April 2007 in Messrs Skrine. In 2009, he joined Messrs Lee Hishamuddin Allen & Gledhill. In April 2014, he joined Messrs C.K. Hau & Co as partner. He is the Chairperson of the KL Bar Young Lawyers Committee for term 2015/2016 as well as for term 2014/2015.

The registration fee for this Forum is RM 10.00 per participant. 

Light lunch refreshments will be served.

Limited seats available. Registration will be on a first-come, first-served basis. Please make payment by 9 December 2015 (Wednesday). Click here for the registration form. 

METHOD OF PAYMENT:

Payment is to be made at any Maybank via bank transfer, cash or cheque

Name of Account: Kuala Lumpur Bar Committee

Account No: 564315003715

Fax the bank in slip to 603-20321090 together with the Registration form.

NOTE:

  • Registration is strictly on a first-come, first-served basis.
  • Confirmation is upon receipt of payment.
  • The Organisers reserve the right to postpone or cancel the event, should any circumstances arise that make such action necessary
  • Fee paid is non-refundable unless the Event is cancelled by the Organisers. If a participant is unable to attend, a replacement participant is allowed.

Should you have any queries, please email Rajan (rajan@klbar.org.my) at the KL Bar Secretariat or call 03-20321440.

This event is brought to you by:

elawyer-new-logo-rawKL Bar Logo

 

Malaysia SME interview: ‘Eddie’s law of successful legal placements sets benchmark’

October 16th, 2015

Eddie Law of eLawyereddie law of elawyer 2

We are pleased to share with you the interview of our founder of eLawyer, Eddie Law, by the prominent Malaysia SME newspaper on 2 October 2015. We reproduced the below interview for your reading pleasure.

Eddie Law is a lawyer. He founded and runs eLawyer, a leading internet based recruitment service for the Malaysian legal fraternity. “Friends say that since I was born a Law, it’s in my blood!” he jokes.

Named by Asia Law Portal as one of the top-thirty most important people in legal circles in the Asia-Pacific, Law, 38, specialises in hiring and placing students, legal secretaries, lawyers, legal managers, partners and legal counsel.

“Our recruitment consultants are lawyers by training, and therefore we understand our clients’ expectations,” he explained. His client base comprises sole-proprietor firms, partnerships and large local and foreign law firms.

“Our corporate clients include private companies, public-listed companies, government-linked organizations, investment banks, regulatory bodies and international corporations.”

After initially practising as a lawyer, Law worked for an IT group as legal advisor before venturing out on his own. He stumbled upon the idea of legal recruitment quite by chance.

“I started a law portal, but the recruitment aspect of it worked out best. So I got all the required licences and worked towards making it big.”

Select and manage

Asked what he would consider the single most important ingredient to being a successful entrepreneur, he replied without hesitation, “The ability to select and manage the right people.”

A young man from Setiawan, Perak, he studies in Chinese primary and secondary schools in the town, after which he had a choice of either taking over his father’s small restaurant or going to university.

“I did not relish the thought of being a chef, so I went to university. Despite not being top of the class at school, I surprised myself with a Second Class Upper,” he recalled with a glint of pride. He studied at UK’s Anglia Ruskin University, and is today their official Alumni Ambassador for Malaysia.

After graduation, his self-confidence soared, and he moved on to bigger things.

“I always tell young lawyers that persistency is a key factor, but so are execution and passion. If you are passionate in what you do, you will do it well and persistently. But the foundation of it all is humility. Without humility, you stop learning and growing.”

His firm currently offers job adverts, resume searches and placement services. Its job advertisement service displays job vacancies online, attracting 500,000 hits every month. Email job updates are received by 7500 registered jobseekers, while its Facebook job updates are viewed by thousands of lawyers and law students.

Another service, a resume search programme, is an active recruitment process through which employers can browse and search for candidates instead of waiting for them to apply. Search results can be filtered by criteria such as years of working experience, specialisation, position level and language proficiency.

He also runs a placement service which sources and screens suitable candidates for employers. Clients only pay upon successful placement.

“We provide free replacement of candidates if the candidate is found unsuitable for the employer’s needs,” he adds.

According to the Asia Law Portal (March 2015), Law is one of only three Malaysians who made the list of top 30 influencers within the Asia-Pacific legal industry.

Blog to follow

His eLawyer Law Blog Forum was also listed as one of the ’12 blogs in Asia to follow in 2015′, by John Grimley, the editor and publisher of Asia Law Portal.

Law said that among some of the manpower issues affecting the professions in Malaysia today are the the shortage of specialist lawyers, the challenge of managing Gen & staff, and the lack of coaching, mentoring and training for young lawyers.

At present, 95% or more of Malaysian law firms cater to the retail market, and less than 5% focus on the corporate market, which involves providing legal services to large corporations and high-net-worth individuals.

“Today, there are more than 6000 law firms in Malaysia, but less than 50 do work for the big corporations. This is because corporations go for big law firms, where they fell they can tap expertise, specialization, and experience. Thus, must corporate work is monopolised by a few large law firms an mid-sized boutique law firms.”

High demand

He noted that there is a high demand for specialists rather than general practitioners, especially in niche areas such as intellectual property, maritime law, and construction arbitration.

Another issue is the challenge of managing Gen-Y staff.

“These are mostly people below 30. They tend to emphasize fulfilment and satisfaction over money, and seek work-life balance, flexibility and autonomy at work.”

“Others seek instant gratification; they need bonuses more often than once a year. They are not willing to wait ten years for a partnership; they will jump ship if there is more money somewhere else.”

How does one attract and retain Gen-Y talent? What would help, says Law, is a lot of coaching and mentoring.

“Unlike the older generation who were left to their own devices, many of the young people I meet say they left their jobs because they did not have enough guidance.”

“Most law firms don’t realise the need for coaching, mentoring and engagement for young lawyers, and often don’t have the time or skills to do this. They are so involved in daily operations, productivity and output, billings and targets, that they often overlook human resource development. ”

“I met many young lawyers who leave because they do not know where they are going in their career.”

“When there is internal training, its mostly for technical skills. There is hardly any training budget, and if there is, the budge allocations are usually for partners. This is one reason why some young lawyers leave law firms and go on to become in-house corporate lawyers. They feel they have more opportunities to grow in larger commercial enterprises.”

He says that as young lawyers progress in their careers, many are expected to become leaders and people managers.

“Legal firms expect you to perform this role but they don’t imbibe you with people management and leadership skills.”

Law suggests that law firms should set aside budgets for training young lawyers in such skills.

“This problem is not confined to legal firms. It applies to SMEs in general, but in the Malaysian case, it is exacerbated by weaknesses in the education system.”

Changes & Challenges: The Corporate Perspective

October 2nd, 2015

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We are proud to be the media partner of this legal event which are co-organized by the Malaysian Current Law Journal and Bar Council Malaysia.

 

Change, it is said, is the wind in the legal profession and indeed the corporate life. With that, we invite you and members of your organization to register for the 2nd biennial Malaysian Legal and Corporate Conference (MLCC) titled ‘Changes & Challenges: The Corporate Perspective’.

 

The conference brings together members of the legal fraternity and corporate sector under one forum, leveraging on a theme that balances the legal and the corporate needs, to discuss pertinent issues of the day. Please view the conference details at  www.mlcc.com.my

 

4 reasons why You and Your Organization will find MLCC Beneficial:

  • The Conference will deliberate on the most awaited legislation - the New Companies Bill. This bill, as you are aware is likely to be gazetted soon, and the conference constitutes an opportunity to understand your role as operators, minders and policy makers of your company under the new legal framework.Two dignitaries, YA Tan Sri Abdull Hamid Embong, Federal Court Judge and Yg Bhg Tan Sri Rafidah, Former Federal Minister and Chairperson of Air Asia X will grace the occasion and speak on the topics of “Understanding Appellate Advocacy” and “Branding Corporate Malaysia Internationally” respectively.

    The Conference also features International Guest Speakers who will speak on “Emerging Markets: Conversation with ASEAN Insiders” – opportunities in China and the ASEAN region.

  •  This Conference is HRDF CLAIMABLE under the Normal SBL Scheme.
  •  SPECIAL RATES
    >> 1 delegate RM 1,400
    >> 3 delegates – get 1 FOC – RM 4,800 i.e. RM 1,200 per delegate
  •  Conference package includes a FREE BOOK worth up to RM290

 

Next step:

To register, or speak to our team on how the conference will benefit your organization, you can choose the following options:

  1. Fill in the attached registration form and email to priority@cljlaw.com
  2. Call the MLCC committee at +603-4270 5400

 

Who should attend:

  1. Corporate Counsel, Company Secretaries and Legal Practitioners

The conference covers a wide range of topics from the New Companies Bill, Insolvency, trial advocacy, and Non-Litigation alternatives to disputes

  1. Executives, Directors, business owners, Business consultants, business development professionals

Updates to the Companies Bill, off shore Planning, Investing in China, a talk on Branding Malaysia by Tan Sri Rafidah Aziz, Forum by ZICOlaw on taking local business regionally, and a special forum on the corporate and legal outlook in the region in the next 5 years

  1. Academics

Keep up to date with the recent development and cross boundary studies and comparison

 

We look forward to your participation in the conference to take full advantage of the line-up of amazing speakers sharing their wealth of experience